Mutoid Man

Foundation Presents

Mutoid Man

Helms Alee, Arms

Sat · June 17, 2017

7:00 pm

The Social

$17.00 - $20.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 12 and over

All patrons must have a valid form of identification present, regardless of age, at the time of entry for all 18+ and 21+ shows and events.

No backpacks, large bags or large purses allowed. Maximum Size 4.5" x 6.5"

No professional audio/visual or any digital recording equipment will be allowed into the venue, without prior permission and arrangements. You must be on the artist photo pass list in order to enter with cameras with detachable lenses.

Mutoid Man
Mutoid Man
There was a buzz about Mutoid Man before they ever even took the stage. Like many 'members-of' projects, there was an automatic interest in what heady metal luminaries Steve Brodsky (Cave In) and Ben Koller (Converge, All Pigs Must Die) were working on in their tiny Brooklyn practice space. By the time they played their first show in the fall of 2013, their debut EP was already recorded and off at the vinyl pressing plant. And while many side projects maintain a brief lifespan by piquing the interest of their primary bands' fans, Mutoid Man achieved the rare feat of not only holding that interest, but also drawing in a new audience from outside their established circles. Given a spin of their Helium Head 12" or a glimpse of their rare live performance, it's no wonder that Brodsky and Koller were able to ascend beyond their side-project novelty status. This is no self-indulgent sonic experiment, no tepid throwaway- track recycling project, no musical 180° into cringe-worthy territory. Instead, Mutoid Man offers up the best of Brodsky and Koller's respective worlds. Brodsky distills the melodicism and metallurgy of Cave In into a concentrated elixir of frantic fretboard work, big riffs, and undeniable vocal hooks. Koller continues to batter his drums with unmatched force and dexterity. With the recruitment of bassist Nick Cageao and his driving low-end growl, Mutoid Man quickly established themselves as one of the dominant new power trios in the world of heavy music.

While Helium Head wasn't a severe sonic departure from its makers' previous endeavors, it still offered up a kind of frenzied excitement and ecstatic energy that was new territory for its members. With their debut full-length, Bleeder, Mutoid Man proves that the euphoric fury of their EP was no fluke. Recorded by Kurt Ballou at God City Studios, Bleeder builds upon the triumphant barrage of Helium Head with bigger production, increased ferocity, and the bolstered confidence from writing as a three-piece unit. The band storms out of the gate with "Bridgeburner", a galloping blitzkrieg of NWOBHM guitar leads, hardcore tempos, and a pummeling climax of bottom-heavy riffage. The album continues on like a gluttonous orgy of every metal indulgence the band has held since junior high school. It's as if there was an amalgam of all these realms of heavy rock music that hadn't yet been attempted, and Mutoid Man have nailed it with such precision that it comes across like a grand epiphany. "Reptilian Soul" and "Sweet Ivy" marry the warped guitar lines of the Hydra Head catalog to balls-to-the-wall rock choruses; "1000 Mile Stare" and "Soft Spot In My Skull" pair Robert Fripp-level prog shredding against a virulent strain of thrash metal; "Surveillance" and "Deadlock" showcase Koller's lightning-fast blast beats against thunderous drop-tuned riffs; "Dead Dreams" beefs up sludge metal to cataclysmic proportions. By the time the band reaches the closing track "Bleeder", they've blown through so many breeds of maleficence that they can effortlessly jump between power-metal balladry, apocalyptic doom, and Dio-era Sabbath.

Mutoid Man was initially meant to be an exercise in flexing the creative chops outside of the members' other projects. But if Helium Head proved that this musical diversion was serious business, Bleeder confirms that Mutoid Man are an imposing force regardless of their pedigree. Written in concentrated flurries between their other musical duties, Bleeder exudes the short bursts of manic energy that typified their creative process. There is no time to sit and ponder the bigger picture, no reason to search for subtlety—once the album launches into the first riff of "Bridgeburner", there is no surrender, no apologies, and no relenting until the final crash and chug of the closing title track. Clocking in at just under half-an-hour, Bleeder seizes upon the same concentrated ferocity of classics like Reign In Blood. And with songs as good as these, Bleeder is sure to become a classic in its own right.

Written by - Brian Cook
Helms Alee
Helms Alee
For anyone unfamiliar with Helms Alee’s sound, it is a bit tricky to categorize or simply file into a specific slot. With the band hailing from the Northwest, gritty grunge acts from the area such as the Melvins or early Nirvana can be detected within, and Helms can even be compared to the Pixies.
Arms
Arms
Orlando-based Arms could send your brain into a spiral if you are not careful. The Mathcore/Noise quartet will draw immediate comparisons to fellow great bands like Converge, The Dillinger Escape Plan, or Botch. The allure to those bands is certainly there. Arms play a dizzying variety of mathematical debauchery that stunts unnecessary senses in an effort to overhaul your temporal lobe's ability to process the cacophonous noise waves ricocheting off of the tympanic membrane. Their newest album, BLACKOUT, was recently presented to me and was released back in January. I give this to you all now because it is madness everyone should experience.

What Arms does well throughout BLACKOUT is balancing these frenetic paces by placing (albeit relatively) restrained songs or sections of songs that allow the listener to get their bearings. The back half of "Ceremonial Monster" is the first example of this, it occurs after the opening track, "Wolfspit", which in itself is an assault on one's wellbeing. This measured mutiny spans 13 songs with personal favorites/recommendations including the title track, "Deerslayer", and "Psalms Muted". The album is broken up well and varied enough to avoid becoming stale "or overbearing. It is a mature and intelligent step for a band to take on an album. It bodes well for the very talented group.

The album was mastered by Jack Shirley at The Atomic Garden who has worked with bands like Deafheaven and Loma Prieta. The group's newest effort is certainly something to check out if you're interested the bands previously mentioned.
Venue Information:
The Social
54 North Orange Ave
Orlando, FL, 32801
http://www.thesocial.org/