Keller Williams

An Evening With

Keller Williams

Thu, November 15, 2012

8:00 pm

The Social

$20.00 - $25.00

This event is 18 and over

All lineups and times subject to change

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Keller Williams
Keller Williams
On December 13, 2011, Keller Williams delivers Bass, his 17th album. Starting with 1994's Freek, Keller has done solo albums, live albums, one with The String Cheese Incident, another with Bob Weir, Michael Franti, Bela Fleck and a bunch of other personal heroes, a bluegrass covers album with Keller & The Keels, a children's album, a remix album, and more. Here Keller shows off, you guessed it, his bass skills with his first record that finds the multi-instrumentalist only on bass guitar.

Bass is also the first album to be recorded with Keller's live reggae-funk band Kdubalicious. Formed in late 2010, in addition to Keller on bass and vocals, the group features Jay Starling on keyboards and Mark D on drums. Though Keller's music, both what he listens to and what he puts out, may always be changing and evolving, there's always one constant: his unique, playful songwriting. Bass is no different in that regard. This may be reggae music - with heavy doses of dub, funk, jazz and even bits of pop and psychedelia - but at the core, it's a Keller Williams record, his warm voice and equally inviting attitude driving the positive vibrations.





Most artists would bristle at the term self-indulgent, but Keller Williams often invokes it in describing his own approach to music. To Williams, being self-indulgent means creating music that satisfies him—if he likes what he's produced, he figures, then his audience is more likely to embrace it too. If he's not happy with it, why would they be?

And so, when Williams describes his first-ever all-covers collection, the amusingly titled Thief, as "self-indulgent, like all of my albums," that signifies not an inwardly pointed diss but a thumbs-up from one of the most tireless musical seekers around. Recorded with the Keels—husband and wife duo Larry and Jenny Keel—Thief is a sequel to the trio's 2006 collaboration Grass, and to those of us on the receiving end, there's nothing self-indulgent about it. If anything, it's about as accessible and welcoming a record as Keller's ever made.

Granted, Thief does require a certain amount of blind faith on the part of the listener: This is, after all, an album that includes songs originally written and recorded by as wildly diverse an assemblage as anyone's ever likely to dream up, from Amy Winehouse ("Rehab") to the Grateful Dead ("Mountains of the Moon"), the Butthole Surfers ("Pepper") to Kris Kristofferson ("Don't Cuss That Fiddle," which opens the album, and "The Year 2003 Minus 25," which closes it). The set is filled out with tunes by Ryan Adams, the Presidents of the United States of America, the Raconteurs, Patterson Hood, Danny Barnes, Cracker, the Yonder Mountain String Band and Marcy Playground. All over the place, yup, but that's the way Williams likes it. And in his hands it all makes sense—like everything he's ever touched, whether from his own pen or someone else's, it all becomes Keller Williams music.

"I'm a music lover first, a musician second and a songwriter third," Williams says, "so a covers record is a natural progression for me. I love writing songs and I love performing my songs—almost all of them. But I go out and do about 120 shows a year, and I just can't write enough to play new songs all the time. There are always different cover songs to learn though; just flipping around on the radio, next thing you know you've got a song stuck in your head. If you change it around and play it completely differently, it sounds like a whole new song."

Since he first appeared on the scene in the early '90s, Keller Williams has defined the independent artist. Most of his career has been spent performing as a one-man band—his stage shows are built around Keller singing his compositions and choice covers while accompanying himself with an acoustic guitar connected to a Gibson Echoplex delay system that allows him to simulate a full band. That approach, Williams explains, was derived from "hours of playing solo with just a guitar and a microphone, and then wanting to go down different avenues musically. I couldn't afford humans and didn't want to step into the cheesy world of automated sequencers where you hit a button and the whole band starts to play, then you've got to solo along or sing on top of it. I wanted something more organic yet with a dance groove that I could create myself."

Williams' solo live shows—and his ability to improvise to his determinedly quirky tunes despite the absence of an actual band—quickly became the stuff of legend, and his audience grew exponentially once word spread about this exciting, unpredictable performer. Keller's albums, meanwhile, beginning with 1994's Freek, were embraced by a wide community of music fans. Unlike his live gigs, Williams has nearly always invited fellow musicians to contribute to his albums, and an alliance with String Cheese Incident led not only to Williams signing with the band's label SCI Fidelity, but a collaborative effort on 1999's Breathe album.

Among his other albums—Thief is his 15th—Williams singles out 2003's Dance, consisting of remixes from the earlier Laugh record, as a personal favorite. He's also fond of his twelfth album, appropriately titled 12, the 2007 compilation for which he chose one track from each of his preceding 11 albums. "That's kind of interesting to hear my history one song at a time," Williams says.

That history begins in Virginia, where Keller was born 40 years ago, and where he lives today. Growing up just south of Washington, D.C., he remembers being exposed to a wide variety of music at an early age, starting with country and bluegrass and working his way up through hip-hop and go-go, a brand of funk particular to that part of the country. Once he began playing guitar, Williams' sphere expanded to what he calls "the post-pseudo-skateboarder punk-rock rebellious type of thing, Black Flag and Sex Pistols and Ramones, Dead Kennedys, things like that. That slid into the more melodic college rock, like the Cure and the Cult, the Smiths, R.E.M.'s first five or six records."

His introduction to the music of the Grateful Dead would become a game-changer for Keller. "I studied and learned their music and went to the shows," he says, adding that the impact of Jerry Garcia on his attitude toward music remains incalculable. Another major influence was Michael Hedges, the late virtuoso acoustic guitarist. "He was really excelling in a whole different world from what I knew," says Williams. "What an amazing force Michael Hedges was as a solo artist."

After moving to Colorado for a few years, further exposure to bluegrass music and progressive acoustic artists such as Béla Fleck and the Flecktones also had a major impression on Williams. As he began to develop his own distinctive compositional and performing style, Williams incorporated all of the lessons he'd learned from the long list of artists who'd found their way into his world, then filtered their music through his own experiences until something wholly unique emerged.

Today he is still exploring and expanding—although Thief (each of Williams' albums bears a single-word title) stays close to traditional bluegrass, eccentric song choices aside, Keller says that his most recent music incorporates elements drawn from electronica and DJ culture. Whatever direction he goes in musically, however, Williams is likely to continue to surprise lyrically. Known for writing about subject matter most simply described as unusual, Keller has no intention of going conventional any time soon. "In the history of music," he says, "there are trillions of love songs and there are so many political songs. I try to find subject matter that's not been written about or maybe hasn't been written about that much."

Keller's thirst for music of all kinds has also led him to the world of radio. For the past seven years he has hosted Keller's Cellar, a weekly syndicated program available on both terrestrial stations and online at www.kellerwilliams.net. Williams describes the show as "a self-indulgent (there's that word again), hour-long narrated mix tape of stuff I'm into. It's rule-less except for what the FCC says we can't do. I don't play contemporary country music. I don't play contemporary Christian music—however, there is possibly some old gospel. I don't play opera. Everything else is fair game. World music from all around—African music from all the countries, jazz, funk, reggae, techno, chill, lounge, lounge singers, rub-a-dub, dancehall. I pretty much stay away from smooth jazz. It's definitely a fun outlet for me."

And more recently, to satisfy his bottomless music jones, Williams has also launched "Once a Week Freek" (www.theonceaweekfreek.com), an online repository of unreleased studio and live tracks, nuggets from his archives, etc. "It's a series that's been going on almost a year. It's me releasing one song a week for download. I started it with the Odd record," he says, referring to his 2009 album release. "I'm trying to do something different."

And it's that last sentence that, in a sense, best sums up what Keller Williams has always been about—something different. Call him "self-indulgent," call him "odd" or even a "thief" if you like (those record titles don't come out of nowhere, you know). Just don't even think of calling him predictable. Wherever else Keller Williams may go from here, you can be sure that he will never title one of his albums Repeat or Bore or Snooze. Anything else, your guess is as good as his.





Those who've followed Keller Williams' recording career to date know that he has given each of his albums a single-word title: Laugh, Buzz, Dance, Home, Loop, Odd, etc. Each title serves not only as a concise summation of the concept guiding the particular project but also as another piece of the jigsaw puzzle that is Keller Williams. Grass, for example, is a bluegrass recording, cut with the husband-wife duo the Keels. Stage is a live album and Dream the end product of a wish list: Keller collaborating with some of his greatest musical heroes.

The naming trend has continued with 2010's Thief and Kids, respectively a set of cover songs and Williams' first children's record. What all of the titles reveal, when taken together, is an artist of great stylistic breadth and infinite imagination, a singer, songwriter and musician, always on a quest for the new. Keller Williams has never followed the prescribed path laid out by the conventional music business but rather one of his own making. It's a path that has served him well.

Since he first appeared on the scene in the early '90s, Williams has defined the term independent artist. And his recordings tell only half the story. Keller built his reputation initially on his engaging live performances, no two of which are ever alike. For most of his career he has performed as a one-man band—his stage shows are constructed around Keller singing his compositions and choice cover songs while accompanying himself on an acoustic guitar connected to a Gibson Echoplex delay system that allows him to simulate a full band. That approach, Williams explains, was derived from "hours of playing solo with just a guitar and a microphone, and then wanting to go down different avenues musically. I couldn't afford humans and didn't want to step into the cheesy world of automated sequencers where you hit a button and the whole band starts to play, then you've got to solo along or sing on top of it. I wanted something more organic yet with a dance groove that I could create myself."

Williams' solo live shows—and his ability to improvise to his determinedly quirky tunes despite the absence of an actual band—quickly became the stuff of legend, and his audience grew exponentially when word spread about this exciting, unpredictable performer. Once he began releasing recordings, starting with 1994's Freek, Williams was embraced by an even wider community of music fans, particularly the jam band crowd. While his live gigs have largely been solo affairs, Williams has nearly always used his albums as a forum for collaborations with fellow musicians. An alliance with The String Cheese Incident on 1999's Breathe marked Williams' first release on the band's label SCI Fidelity Records, an imprint he still partners with today for recordings. Dream, Keller's 2007 release, found him in the company of such iconic musicians as the Grateful Dead's Bob Weir, banjo master Béla Fleck, bass great Victor Wooten and many others.

"That album took, from start to release time," says Williams, "about three years. The object was to get people that I admire musically to play my stuff, so when I'm old I can crank this album in my pimped-out golf cart and have something that I'm really proud of. I was going for the historical effect for my own personal listening pleasure.

"Each record," he continues, "is a little snapshot of history. I like to think of it as a period piece for an artist. Each record is a little bit different but all of them have some kind of common thread, which is my musical ability as far as I can take it. They each show how I progress with age. I enjoy making records. In some people's eyes, they're a dying breed, but I'm very passionate about it. They document where my head is at that time in my career and where I am in my songwriting."

Williams' story begins in Virginia, just south of Washington, D.C. There he was exposed to a wide variety of music at an early age, starting with country and bluegrass and working his way up through hip-hop and go-go, a brand of funk particular to that part of the country. Once he began playing guitar, Williams' sphere expanded to what he calls "the post-pseudo-skateboarder punk-rock rebellious type of thing, Black Flag and Sex Pistols and Ramones, Dead Kennedys, things like that. That slid into the more melodic college rock, like the Cure and the Cult, the Smiths, R.E.M.'s first five or six records."

Then came the Grateful Dead, a seminal influence on Williams' own music. "I studied and learned their music and went to the shows," he says, adding that the impact of Jerry Garcia on his attitude toward music remains incalculable. Another major influence was Michael Hedges, the late virtuoso acoustic guitarist. "He was really excelling in a whole different world from what I knew," says Williams.

After relocating to Colorado, further exposure to bluegrass music and progressive acoustic artists such as Béla Fleck and the Flecktones also had a major impression on Williams. As he began to develop his own distinctive compositional and performing style, Williams incorporated all of the lessons he'd learned from the long list of artists who'd found their way into his world, then filtered their music through his own experiences until something wholly unique emerged. The list of artists whose music he has covered either in concert or on his recordings constitutes a mind-blowing spread: songs originally performed by everyone from Pink Floyd and Ozzy Osbourne to Ani DiFranco and old-school rappers the Sugar Hill Gang!

When he first started out, Williams played in regional bands but also performed as a solo artist, "me sitting on a stool playing covers, like a happy hour situation," he says. "I'd get dinner and maybe tips. There were bands in high school and in college. But it turned out I could get the same money playing solo that I was getting with the band. Around that time I was also doing temporary jobs like landscaping, and I was making the same amount playing music as I was shoveling mulch and digging up weeds for eight hours in the summertime at minimum wage. So it seemed like the obvious choice was to play music. I started to work and over the years I incorporated more technology. The looping thing started to happen and tickets were sold and people came to shows, so there wasn't any reason to fix something that wasn't broken."

What Williams calls "the looping thing" is actually a big part of what has made him such a compelling live performer. "Basically, I have these machines that are essentially delay units," he explains. "What I do is step on a button and sing or play something. Then I step on the same button in time and it repeats what I just played or sang. Once that initial loop is created, I can layer on a bass line or a drum line and then have this layer that I just created in front of an audience that I could sing over and solo over. Nothing is pre-recorded. Everything is created onstage in front of the audience."

If it sounds complicated, it is: but the basic thrust is that the technology has allowed Williams to go out on tour week after week, year after year, and play music by himself—without limiting his sound to what we most often associate with the solo singer-songwriter: a guy strumming a guitar and singing. With his arsenal of tech toys, Williams can expand his reach onstage by, in essence, jamming with himself.

But he has, on several occasions, also performed with real bands. The summer of 2010 found Keller sharing a bus with two of his biggest heroes, former Grateful Dead drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart, as a member of their powerhouse assemblage the Rhythm Devils. "That was a very surreal experience," Williams says. "We rehearsed for a few days and then we were on a bus with 12 people, two of them being the original drummers from the Grateful Dead." On that tour, Williams was put in the enviable position of singing many songs from the Grateful Dead catalog for audiences that loved every minute of it.

Williams has also toured as part of a string trio with singer/guitarist Larry Keel and his wife, singer/bassist Jenny Keel, hitting key stops on the bluegrass festival circuit. And he has a band of his own, with Keller on rhythm guitar and vocals, Jeff Sipe on drums, Keith Moseley on bass and Gibb Droll on lead guitar. They toured throughout the spring of 2007 to the fall of 2008, and subsequently released a double live record with a companion DVD. In true Keller Williams fashion, it's called Live.

If it seems as if this is a man who never stops, that would be about right. Having already released the amusingly titled Thief—his all-covers project with the Keels—early in 2010, Williams was getting ready to release Kids, his sixteenth album, in the fall. A father of two himself, Williams was, of course, inspired by his own offspring but, he says, some of the songs were written before his children were born. "When Not For Kids Only by Jerry Garcia and David Grisman came out, I knew that there was hope for me with kids music," he says. "I was really attached to that record." The songwriting for Kids, Keller says, "was not necessarily singing to the kids. A lot of it was me singing from the perspective of the kids. That was my plan, to get on their wavelength, on their level, and be one of them, so it's kind of like one of their friends singing to them."

The tracks, with titles like "Car Seat," "Because I Said So," "Mama Tooted" and "Taking a Bath," are witty, catchy and never speak down to the intended audience. All of them will resonate with any parent as well as the little ones. "I was thinking not only of the kid getting it but also of the parents having to listen to it," Williams says. "That played a large role in the writing of this record. I've been in the place of the parent having to sit through something the kid loves but I'm not so into. And the music, of course, had to be light and positive but still organic and not too far away from where my musical head is. This record's not a compromise from what I normally do." To coincide with the release of Kids, Williams planned several live dates as a touring member of the Yo Gabba Gabba! tour—and if you have no idea what that is or think it's a Ramones cover band, you probably don't have young kids of your own.

As if all of this doesn't keep him busy enough, Keller's thirst for music of all kinds has also led him to the world of radio. For the past several years he has hosted Keller's Cellar, a weekly syndicated program available on both terrestrial stations and online at www.kellerwilliams.net. Williams describes the show as "a self-indulgent, hour-long narrated mix tape of stuff I'm into. It's rule-less except for what the FCC says we can't do. I don't play contemporary country music. I don't play contemporary Christian music—however, there is possibly some old gospel. I don't play opera. Everything else is fair. World music from all around—African music from all the countries, jazz, funk, reggae, techno, chill, lounge, lounge singers, rub-a-dub, dancehall. I pretty much stay away from smooth jazz. It's definitely a fun outlet for me. I'm trying to do something different."

Something different. That, we can assume, is how it will always be with Keller Williams.
Venue Information:
The Social
54 North Orange Ave
Orlando, FL, 32801
http://www.thesocial.org/